Search
  • Hannah Chilcote

Spring Cleaning — How Long Should You Keep Financial Records?

Updated: Jun 16

If you are like everyone else who’s been stuck at home for the past month, you are purging everything you can. Here are the do's and don'ts when it comes to tossing financial records.


Once tax season is over, you may want to file your most recent records and discard older records to make room for the new ones. According to the IRS, personal tax records should be kept for three years after filing your return or two years after the taxes were paid, whichever is later.* (Different rules apply to business taxes.)

The rules and time limits recommended for tax records can also be applied to other records you use for deductions on your return, such as credit card statements, utility bills, auto mileage records, and medical bills. Here are some other guidelines if you don't use these records for tax purposes:

Financial statements. You generally have 60 days to dispute charges with banks and credit card companies, so you could discard statements after two months. Once you receive your annual statement, throw out prior monthly statements.


Retirement plan statements. Keep quarterly statements until you receive your annual statement; keep annual statements until you close the account. Keep records of nondeductible IRA contributions indefinitely to prove you paid taxes on the funds.


Real estate and investment records. Keep these at least until you sell the asset. If the sale is reported on your tax return, follow the rules for tax records.


Loan documents. Keep documents and proof of payment until the loan is paid off. After that, keep proof of final payment.


Auto records. Keep registration and title information until the car is sold. You might keep maintenance records for reference and to document services to a new buyer.


Medical records. Keep records indefinitely for surgeries, major illnesses, lab tests, and vaccinations. Keep payment records until you have proof of a zero balance.

Other documents you should keep indefinitely include birth, marriage, and death certificates; divorce decrees; citizenship and military discharge papers; and Social Security cards. Use a shredder if you discard records containing confidential information such as Social Security numbers and financial account numbers.

*Keep tax records for at least six years if you underreported gross income by more than 25% (not a wise decision) and for seven years if you claimed a deduction for worthless securities or bad debt.

This article was originally prepared, for Maestro Associates, by Broadridge advisor.


Follow Maestro Associates on LinkedIn and Facebook for more straight talk from the financial industry.


Of course, being in the financial industry we have to let you know that this communication is not constituted as financial advice. Investments are not insured by the FDIC or any other government entity. Investment and insurance products are subject to investment risk, including possible loss.

0 views

600 S Cherry St, Suite 801, Denver CO 80246

 info@maestro-associates.com 

 303.316.7900

broker check logo.png

LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Maestro Associates is an independent firm not affiliated with Money Concepts Capital Corp.

All securities through Money Concepts Capital Corp. Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments are not FDIC/NCUA insured. No bank or credit union guarantee. May lose value. Money Concepts Advisory Services is a Registered Investment Advisor with the SEC.

© 2020 Maestro Associates LLC